St. Jerome’s Laneway Festival Highlights

Candy-coated almonds are phenomenal.  So much so that one can forget that they actually contain any ounce of nutritional value in them for the entire duration of consumption.  Why am I bringing this up?  Well, certainly because Meadow Brook has some phenomenal concessions, and people should invest more in them.  But mostly because I am obsessed with candy-coated almonds.  When I was a kid, I would attend women’s basketball games at the Palace way too often just so I could convince my Mom to pick up some of those little droplets of heaven for me.  But I must confess something: at St. Jerome’s Laneway Festival on Saturday, September 14, 2013, I didn’t have a single nut.

Why is it that I never got my hands on the one thing that makes me truly happy?  Because everything else at Laneway was just too damn good.  The festival was distractingly good, actually.  My stomach awoke in almond-less loathing the next day, but it was worth it.

People keep asking me who my favorite bands at Laneway were, and I am mortified by the question much of the time.  Instead of approaching such a difficult inquiry, I will instead detail my Laneway highlights, musical and otherwise.

 

The HAERTS Persona

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Those of you who got the chance to see HAERTS open up Laneway Festival with unforgettable gusto know that they were one of the best bands on the list this year at Laneway.  They delivered several times over when it came to putting us in the Laneway mood at 12:40 pm on Roscoe Stage.  They definitely made my top 5 bands of the day, and that’s not just because I love chick singers.

A really important part of the HAERTS experience for me happened after the show, however.  About fifteen minutes after the crowd had migrated a little to the right (Derrick Stage) to see Youth Lagoon, the members of HAERTS appeared on the side of this stage behind the gate.  They walked with such purpose up to the gate, said NOTHING (no joke, nothing), and the gate guard just opened the door for them to proceed to strut right out into and through the Youth Lagoon crowd.

The few patches of people who happened to be so far to the right of the crowd that they were able to view such an occurrence became like kittens in the rain, on their toes and terrified as ever.  But get this, the band just walked on past them all like this was completely normal, and headed with so much style to what appeared to be the beer/food area.  The band was akin to Judd Nelson at the end of “The Breakfast Club,” striding across the football field with such clout.  I could hear “Don’t You (Forget About Me)” playing in the background, I’m not kidding.  Oh, and then HAERTS’ band members proceeded to go to the other bands’ shows and be super into them, which is something that I didn’t see many other band members doing much that day.  Holy cow, HAERTS is so cool.  I’ve already hung a photo of them on my dream board.

 

People Who Like ADULT.

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ADULT. represented their hometown wonderfully with their acclaimed freaky-electronic fervor.  They knocked socks off and turned them inside out repeatedly and without hesitation.  What stood out to me most about this show, however, was that the immense passion of Adam and Nicola spread like the plague onto their enchanted audience.  Instead of bouncing slightly from one leg to the next (with one pocketed hand at all times, in generic hipster fashion), as the crowd had in most other shows that day, the ADULT. fans refused to contain themselves.  People were flopping around rampantly from head to toe the entire time.  THE ENTIRE TIME.  Beers were spilling on wardrobes, shoulders were being bumped repeatedly by unknown neighbors, and beanies were falling to the ground to be immediately stomped on by combat boots.  And the characters doing the romping knew the words, they knew the beats, and they always wanted to yell about everything.  They woo-ed with greater forte every time Nicola so much as looked up at them (which seemed like it happened a lot, but it was hard to tell because she was wearing sunglasses).  The scene was an exposition of beauty I had never seen before.  So, as far as fans go, ADULT. fans won Laneway.  Well done, ADULT. fans.  Well done.

 

The Frightened Rabbit Accordion

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The Frightened Rabbit performance was a phenomenal one by all measures: great tone, balanced set list, and ability to make you groove from yards and yards away.  They also had that whole “being Scottish” thing going for them, which only made the audience more fascinated by their every move.  Oh, and the frontman Scott Hutchinson swore a lot.  In a Scottish accent.  Ladies and gentlemen, it’s everything you’d ever hoped it could be and more.

As it turns out, Frightened Rabbit also has a knack for hyping up the audience with opportunities for their participation.  So, in line with such a skill, Scott Hutchinson requests that in one of their songs the audience acts as an accordion, holding one foundational tone the whole time as accordions are often want to do.  So, of course I’m freaking out about this because it just so happens that one of my childhood dreams is, in fact, to be an accordion for a Scottish band.

When the time comes, Hutchinson holds up his hand and we all make this “ahhhhhh” sound in unison with the tone he has given us moments earlier.  And we’re holding it and we’re holding it.  And it’s wonderful because I find myself looking around at other audience members who are floundering a bit with their note after a minute or so.  Then I spot those proud vocalists in the crowd who are still hanging in there.  Suddenly I feel my diaphragm closing in on itself and I look to others who are also gasping for air to complete the job.  But the thing is: we don’t even know when this song ends!  But we still want to try our hardest to fulfill our collective destiny which was just made for us by Hutchinson.  And suddenly we are all brothers and sisters in surrender, understanding the silliness of our overwhelming devotion to our accordion.  We start breathing again.  And we laugh.

 

CHVRCHES, in General

CHVRCHES went up on stage with the freedom of the majestic African antelope and the confidence of its predatory lion combined.  Lauren Mayberry’s exquisite voice bellowed their famous track “Gun” through the crowd, and I was in a trance.

This band was my favorite of the bands I saw perform at Laneway for a number of reasons.  Firstly, I believe their stage presence attained the ideal level of liveliness and unpredictability.  The life came from the sounds themselves: electronic tones with powerful lyrics.  The unpredictability stemmed from the band’s primitive and almost spiritual body movements on stage.  All three members just danced like crazy pretty much the entire time, ceasing only when absolutely necessary.  I especially enjoyed when instrumentalist and vocalist, Martin Doherty lost complete control and just started flailing around like crazy.  Even the bassist, Iain Cook couldn’t help but bounce around for the entire set.  See, a lot of bands at Laneway were kind of scanning the crowd in the hopes that loads of people would be grooving to their tunes, but CHVRCHES did enough grooving for all of us.  In fact, it seemed like they didn’t even notice us at points because they were too lost in the sounds.

CHVRCHES was also memorable for me because I felt like I never knew what they were going to say and I was fascinated by that in an obsessive way.  For instance, at one point, Mayberry started talking about the fact that Madonna grew up in “this fair state,” and how it was safe to assume that we would catch a glimpse of the pop phenomenon just wandering about at Meadow Brook on that very date.  This was incredible to me because:

  1. The way she said “this fair state” had the be the cutest way in which anyone has ever said anything.

  2. I imagine someone must have told her a few facts about Michigan (or potentially Detroit) before the band stopped here on their tour.  After being informed of the basics, she consciously thought, “Well, I figure of all the people I know of who grew up in Michigan (famed Detroit-ers included), I definitely feel most comfortable talking about Madonna (who actually grew up in Bay City, turns out).”  That was a thought she really had, and I think that’s the best thought ever because no one else would think that.

  3. After saying all of the this, she started to tell us that she couldn’t hear a lot of our responses to what she said because of her elaborate headset bit.  But she revealed that she would sometimes just imagine that we were all saying such things as, “We most certainly will spot Madonna today,” and, “You’re just so intelligent,” and, “Your shoes look really nice today,” etc.  She may have thought her mention of Madonna was awkward (which it wasn’t), so she diffused it by being the coolest person in the world.

After getting to know how much Mayberry resembles a kitten, we were all blessed to catch a glimpse of Doherty taking the reigns and whipping out his ever-hypnotic vocal tones.  At this point, after seeing him get down (and I mean, GET DOWN) for the past few songs, I think we all were dying to dive into his psyche in whatever way possible, so this worked out.  He proceeded to offer some of the most sincere and sacred vocalization I had seen that day.  Oh, and he did not stop dancing.  In fact, he took this opportunity to dance more!  I am almost certain his well-worn Nikes did not touch the floor for full minutes.

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Finally, CHVRCHES chose to play “Science/Vision,” a phenomenally ethereal surge of peacefulness.  The words “Breathe, don’t speak, it’s leaving your body now” seemed to pulsate through the crowd, and it was perfection.

This performance topped my list because it offered a superior sound even than their recordings, and it felt wild and spiritual.  I never stopped being impressed by the amount of personality on stage, and for that, CHVRCHES was my Laneway favorite.

 

The Science of Sound

At one point, I could hear Frightened Rabbit on Roscoe Stage, AlunaGeorge on Meadow Stage, and Katy Perry’s “Roar” on the speakers by the entrance simultaneously.  So cool.

 

Kindness

Last, but certainly not least, I want to address something that made me happier than all others that day.  The simple virtue of kindness is often disregarded in life when one has a goal for oneself, and even more often when one is in a large group of strangers.  Laneway folks were an exception to this rule, and for that I was very grateful.

Each lawn show had its own crew of front-rowers waiting earnestly for the band’s arrival to the stage.  The difference between these front-rowers and the front-rowers at most other shows, however, is that these people weren’t going to push you to the ground if you suggested with your body movements that you wanted to get closer to the band.  I saw so many people weaving in and out of the crowd to evaluate the sound wave quality in different grass patches, and there was no conflict whatsoever in these instances.  I even saw people giving up their seats in the Pavilion during Sigur Ros.  Sigur Ros, people!  I personally felt free to stand anywhere I wanted without being hassled by anyone, which is very rare for someone as paranoid as I am about mosh casualties.  People were giving each other the opportunity to see the bands they loved in a more real way, and I found that absolutely amazing.  Special shout out here to the guy who walked up to me at the beginning of the National’s show and handed me an All-Access pass for no reason so I could see them from anywhere I wanted.  Kindness.

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At several points during the Washed Out show especially, I noticed pure gentleness and sincerity in the acts of others.  Washed Out was ever-glorious (among the top 5 as well), as always, but they took a little while to get started.  No fault of their own, of course, because there were some apparent technical issues at the beginning of their set.  Aside from a few joking hollers of “At Least One Song” (in place of “One More Song”), the fans were stationary and respectful.  They looked at it more as a chance to catch the Washed Out crew candidly handling the situation and just being as chill as you would expect about everything.  During what seemed like a rather long delay, after all, the crowd just loved one another and made friends.

Within minutes of the power being right again, I spotted a decent-sized dance circle in the middle of the mass.  I built up the courage to ask these awesome people if I could dance with them, and they made me feel like I had just handed them the golden ticket straight from my own Wonka Bar.  They were stoked to have me join them for some reason, and they never once made me feel weird about it (even though I was dancing at my utmost weird).  As the concert continued, this group grew in number with strangers who felt comfortable participating in the dance.  By the time I left there were people dancing next to each other and shaking hands all around me and I couldn’t feel my limbs anymore.  That’s what happens to me when I am overwhelmed by kindness.  Props to the Laneway attendees for loving one another so wonderfully.  The rest wouldn’t have mattered in the least if they hadn’t.


St. Jeromes Laneway Music Festival-Detroit 2013-Photo Gallery

Photo Gallery from St. Jeromes Laneway Festival – Detroit 2013

The National. Sigur Rós, Deerhunter, The Dismemberment Plan, Solange, El-P and Killer Mike as Run The Jewels, Frightened Rabbit, CHVRCHES, AlunaGeorge, Savages, Warpaint, Phosphorescent, Youth Lagoon, Washed Out, Icona Pop, Flume, My Brightest Diamond, Haerts, Shigeto, Matthew Dear Chet Faker, Beacon, and Adult..

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Laneway Festival Artist Profiles : Hip-Hop, Indie Rock, and In Between

One day away, friends! We’re up to the end of the week and that means tomorrow September 14 will be the event this has all been leading up to. St. Jerome’s Laneway Festival has landed on U.S. soil for the first time, and we as Michigan residents have to thank the festival organizers and promoters for choosing our state to showcase such a diverse and talented lineup of artists from the music world. All 24 of Laneway’s artists have been profiled by us during this past week with the conclusion of this article. We’d like to thank our readers and supporters of Laneway for taking a glimpse into the hard work of these artists and why their contributions to Laneway are significant (and of course, why you are going to have so much fun tomorrow!). Let us now look at the last six artists from the indie genres of rock, folk, electronic and hip-hop…

Youth Lagoon

  • Taking the Derrick Stage from 1:25-2:10 pm
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Trevor Powers has been recording under the alias Youth Lagoon since 2010, and since that time he has concocted a neo-psychedelic type of haze that has produced 2011’s The Year Of Hibernation and most recently 2013’s Wondrous Bughouse. The themes in Youth Lagoon’s music have always had an air of loneliness, partially due to the fact that Powers grew up in Boise, Idaho, a city that isn’t as impacted by music culture the same way a city like San Diego, California is (Powers’ birthplace). Youth Lagoon hits on many levels to draw listeners into his work — the ambiance, the electronics, the emotion — get caught up in it all starting at 1:25 on the Derrick Stage.

Phosphorescent

  • Taking the Roscoe Stage from 2:15-3:00 pm
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Phosphorescent is a name fairly new to the music game, but the musician behind Phosphorescent is no amateur. Matthew Houck has been working as a singer-songwriter since 2000. He first started off with the moniker Fillup Shack and released a limited album pressing titled Hipolit. Starting in 2003, Houck took the Phosphorescent name and has released 6 full albums and an EP, with his most recent work being 2013’s Muchacho on Dead Oceans records. Phosphorescent’s mellow indie-folk sounds will be highlighted on the Roscoe Stage from 2:15 until 3 pm.

Frightened Rabbit

  • Taking the Roscoe Stage from 3:55-4:40 pm
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Scotland’s Frightened Rabbit are an indie folk/rock band who have been active since 2003, but were never conceived originally as a band. Frightened Rabbit’s lead singer/guitarist Scott Hutchison planned for a solo project, but gained 4 more members down the line to turn Frightened Rabbit into a fully realized band who have released 4 full albums, 5 EPs, and a slew of singles in their careers. 2013’s release from the band Pedestrian Verse has had them touring harder than ever, and they will be welcomed to the Roscoe Stage by Laneway starting at 3:55 pm.

Deerhunter

  • Taking the Roscoe Stage from 5:35-6:25 pm
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Deerhunter are a band known for their image almost as well as their music. Leader of the pack Bradford Cox has been notorious for wearing sundresses on stage and smearing his skin with blood, which makes us as an audience wonder what we can expect from their set at Laneway. With a dash of Sonic Youth-style lovely noise, a little disco, and a pinch of bubblegum pop, Deerhunter create a style of indie rock which doesn’t sound typical for this time. Unusual as they are, Deerhunter have still managed to garnish praise from dozens of publications, media outlets, and of course, fans of their eccentric style. Catch Deerhunter on the Roscoe Stage at 5:35 pm.

Run The Jewels (EL-P & Killer Mike)

  • Taking the Meadow Stage from 5:45-6:30 pm
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Both EL-P and Killer Mike are tremendously bad-ass on their own, but together, they have spawned Run The Jewels, a collaboration a long-time coming. Back in 2012, EL-P produced Killer Mike’s album R.A.P. Music, which received universally positive reviews for Killer Mike’s lyrical prowess and EL-P’s synth-boom production. Killer Mike then made an appearance on EL-P’s album Cancer 4 Cure, and their next pursuit together became this year’s Run The Jewels, made available through a free digital download for anyone to pick up. The intensity and sense of humor will make for a fantastic show beginning at 5:45 pm on the Meadow Stage.

The Dismemberment Plan

  • Taking the Derrick Stage from 6:30-7:20 pm
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Back in 2003, The Dismemberment Plan called it quits. They had released 4 albums and a couple of EPs up to that point, but the band made no future plans for anything musical. In 2007, they played a one-time reunion show in Washington D.C. which started a tease that lasted up until the release of their latest album of new material in over a decade. The Dismemberment Plan defined the genre of dance-punk and brought new wave back from the 80s, and it’s a fortunate thing that they haven’t been gone for good. Uncanney Valley is full of the confident sound that the band has rightfully earned starting out in the early 90s and reuniting to a larger audience of fans than ever. In their past live performances, The Dismemberment Plan have been known to get the crowd involved and up on stage, so make sure you are in a great place in front of the Derrick Stage at 6:30 pm to catch this show.

We hope we will see you at St. Jerome’s Laneway Festival tomorrow at Meadow Brook Music Festival in Rochester Hills! Gates are at 11 am, be sure to check Laneway’s official website for any last-minute information and download their festival app for your phone to set up a personal itinerary for yourself with start times and alerts. Read about the other 18 artists performing at Laneway here at Detroit Sounds Like This, and visit us next week for more photos & articles pertaining to Laneway after it’s all finished!


Laneway Festival Artist Profiles : Ladies Who Will Rock Laneway

Festival organizers are already busy at Meadow Brook Music Festival setting up for this Saturday. We are continuing to give our readers coverage on Laneway which profiles the artists on the bill and what you might expect to see from their sets on Saturday at St. Jerome’s first Laneway Festival USA. Today we look at five artists on the roster who have one important common tie — they have women in the band who take the stage by storm. Yesterday we took a look at amazing women such as Aluna Francis (AlunaGeorge), Lauren Mayberry (CHVRCHES), and Caroline Hjelt & Aino Jawo (Icona Pop). Today we continue with another group of women who will get you get you rocking, carry you away, and leave you in awe.

Haerts

  • Taking the Roscoe Stage from 12:40-1:20 pm
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Haerts are a 5-piece outfit from Brooklyn who are very new to the scene, but already drawing in listeners with a likeable, nostalgic sweetness that kicks off Laneway on a very good vibe. Nini Fabi has a voice that glows with every lyric she sings, set against a glossy instrumentation that if you close your eyes, could be playing in 1993 just as well as 2013. Haerts have not confirmed any set dates on a debut album yet, but after taking a listen to Laneway’s first artist of the day, you might be waiting with anticipation as well.

My Brightest Diamond

  • Taking the Pavilion Stage from 1:35-2:20 pm
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Shara Worden scores for Laneway right away for being the only artist on the lineup from Detroit who isn’t on the Movement/Ghostly Stage. Furthermore, her superb talents as a singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist will treat her Laneway audience to a set filled with indie rock, chamber pop, folk, opera, and more. My Brightest Diamond does not just put on a concert — they put on an entire production. After working with fellow Michigander Sufjan Stevens and his Illinoisemakers project and going on tour with them as a cheerleading captain, Worden came back with the idea to develop My Brightest Diamond and record in the summer of 2006. Since then, My Brightest Diamond has impressed in person around the world, and we can expect the same with a hometown Laneway performance.

Warpaint

  • Taking the Derrick Stage from 3:05-3:50 pm
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Warpaint are four women from Los Angeles who craft psychedelic-laced indie rock with delicate vocals and full-bodied serpentine guitar goodness. Since their formation in 2004 they have release an acclaimed EP (Exquisite Corpse, 2007), as well as a full-length album (The Fool, 2010) of their artful sounds. Current members are Emily Kokal, Theresa Wayman, Jenny Lee Lindberg, and Stella Mozgawa, who replaced original drummer Shannyn Sossamon. They have acknowledged themselves that in their sound, they are going for an “underwater” feeling — a description that, if you’ve listened to Warpaint, puts together an accurate picture in echoey deep blues & greens.

Savages

  • Taking the Derrick Stage from 4:45-5:30 pm
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Savages broke out of London onto the music scene this past year injected with the attitude, talent, and gripping post-punk sensibilities that have made them one of the most praised and respected bands to come into indie rock. Jehnny Beth’s deep, passionate vocals roar over Gemma Thompson’s rough-in-all-the-right places guitar playing, Ayse Hassan’s throbbing bass and Fay Milton’s stormy drumming — watching Savages perform live is a submissive act, all we as an audience can do is shut up and let their powers take us over, and be better for it when we realize afterward what hit us. This can’t-miss set will begin on the Derrick Stage at 4:45 pm.

Solange

  • Taking the Pavilion Stage from 6:35-7:20 pm
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Solange may carry the “Knowles” last name, but don’t let that fool you — Solange has stepped out on her own with a retro, funk-infused R&B sound very apparent in her 2012 release True. Her infectiously upbeat stage presence, knack for bold styles, and soulful singing will give the crowd at Laneway a performance guaranteed to leave a smiling impression when it’s over. Solange has come a long way in her musical career since the very early 2000s, and now that she has come into her own style of poppy indie R&B, she can own it and show us all why her musical path lead her right here. Get down with Solange on the Pavilion Stage starting at 6:35 pm.

Only one day of artist profiles left to count down! Check back to Detroit Sounds Like This tomorrow for the last group of artists on the lineup and what you’ll expect for Saturday. Visit Laneway’s official website for even more.


Laneway Festival Artist Profiles : Aussies and Electro-Pop

Wednesday means the middle of the work week and the 3-day-away countdown to the St. Jermone’s Laneway Festival at Meadow Brook Music Festival. We have profiled the headliners of the festival as well as the electronic talents of the Movement/Ghostly Stage, and today we are taking a look at five artists who come from the realm of electronic music. Two of the artists in particular hail from the home land Laneway was born on — Australia. Read more below about who will be compelling your body to break out the dance moves this weekend.

Chet Faker

  • Taking the Meadow Stage from 2:25-3:10 pm
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Melbourne Australia’s Nicholas James Murphy goes by Chet Faker and delivers a blend of electronica and soul which has already gained him breakthrough artist recognition in Australia. His 2012 release Thinking In Textures earned him the Rolling Stone Australia award for ‘Best Independent Release’ and his internet-circulated cover of Blackstreet’s classic 1996 smooth jam “No Diggity” saw him garnering dozens of new fans all over the world. His chosen alias is a dedication to one of Murphy’s greatest influences in his vocal delivery, jazz great Chet Baker. Discover Chet Faker’s stirring style on the Meadow Stage beginning at 2:25 pm.

CHVRCHES

  • Taking the Pavilion Stage from 3:15-4:00 pm
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Glasgow’s CHVRCHES are one of the most buzzed about bands in the indie-pop world right now. Since the release of their 2012 single “The Mother We Share,” Lauren Mayberry, Iain Cook, and Martin Doherty have been building social media hype and releasing a string of singles and an EP (Recover) up to the release of their debut album, The Bones Of What You Believe, which will drop on September 24. You can hear the post-punk influence of The Cure in the glistening, keyboard-driven electro-pop of CHVRCHES music, which is highlighted by the ethereally pure vocals of Lauren Mayberry. This is a set you will not want to miss.

AlunaGeorge

  • Taking the Meadow Stage from 4:05-4:50 pm
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London duo Aluna Francis and George Reid released their debut album, Body Music this past July, filled with upbeat blends of pop, electronic and R&B that recall what was so great about the 90s decade. AlunaGeorge have stated in interviews with Pitchfork that their sound is influenced by artists like Timbaland and the Neptunes with George Reid quoted as saying that their sound was from a time when “At one point, people weren’t being so afraid to do something a bit weird.” The woozy loops and honey-sweet vocals of AlunaGeorge will be on the Meadow Stage from 4:05-4:50 pm.

Icona Pop

  • Taking the Pavilion Stage from 4:55-5:40 pm
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If you didn’t get “I Love It” stuck in your head at least once this past year, you must have been living somewhere other than Earth (although I wouldn’t discount Icona Pop playing on another planet entirely, either). The Swedish electro-house sweethearts Caroline Hjelt and Aino Jawo have been getting people on the dance floor since they exploded in 2012. Their first US release is slated for September 24, and with the duo naming influences on their music such as Robyn, Britney Spears, and Daft Punk, we can only predict that the rest of the tracks on This Is…Icona Pop will get us dancing around a room as hard as their first single. The Pavilion Stage at 4:55 will be the place to be dancing and singing along that you’re a 90s bitch.

Flume

  • Taking the Meadow Stage from 7:25-8:15 pm
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Harley Streten goes by Flume and in just over a year’s time from the release of his self-titled debut, he has gained international recognition in the electronic world and received platinum status from ARIA (the Australian Recording Industry Association) at only 21 years old. Flume creates a dazzling, lush electronic sound by drawing inspiration from every genre sample that he can get his hands on. Diversity is the key to Flume’s work, which has made his electronic genre difficult to categorize yet draws people in to see how the sounds, visuals, and presence all come together in his stage show. See for yourself at 7:25 on the Meadow Stage.

We hope our readers are getting as pumped up about Laneway as we are, check in with us tomorrow for a continuation of artist profiles and check Laneway’s official website for up-to-the-minute information.


Laneway Makes Its Way to Michigan

Laneway

Back in 2004, two men by the name of Jerome Borazio and Danny Rogers were steadily booking several up-and-coming indie bands at St. Jerome’s Bar in the Caledonian Lane area of Melbourne, Australia.  The music started out inside of the bar during the summer month series, and after a request from Borazio and Rogers to the band The Avalanches, the music was taken into the street, closing down the lane and beginning the very first installment of the now internationally known St. Jerome’s Laneway Festival.  The spontaneous excitement and organization that was in the air over the very first Laneway in Melbourne is now coming to the United States for the first time, where hundreds of music fans looking to see what is happening in the contemporary indie music scene will come to Meadowbrook Music Festival in Rochester Hills, MI on September 14.

The size of the festivals, the locations and the way we encourage community all form part of the way in which the Laneway team strive to present an urban music experience like no other.

-St. Jerome’s Laneway Festival Philosophy Statement

The Laneway Festival began expanding throughout several cities in Australia beginning in 2006, including Sydney, Brisbane, Adelaide, and Perth, and now covers Singapore as well as the United States.  The announcement of the festival coming to Michigan came during Laneway’s party at the SXSW Festival in Austin, TX this past March. Not only does this mark the first time that Laneway has come to the United States, it also marks the first time that an Australian music festival has come to North America. When the curiosity began to buzz about why Laneway organizers chose the Detroit area as a sensible location for the festival, Danny Rogers shared that he believes “Detroit is having its rebirth and as Laneway continues to evolve, we can identify with a city that is continuing to evolve as well.”

Laneway has featured several artists vital to the contemporary indie music scene in their past lineups, including Yo La Tengo, Feist, Mumford & Sons, Blonde Redhead, and M83, among dozens of others. The Laneway Detroit lineup features co-headliners The National and Sigur Rós, both of whom released albums earlier in 2013 and are known for their grandiose live performances.  Rounding out the bill are other indie favorites Deerhunter and The Dismemberment Plan, as well as newly teamed Hip-Hop heavyweights Killer Mike and EL-P performing as Run The Jewels.  With a lineup that boasts several acts showcasing sub-genres under the indie music umbrella, festival attendees will get a chance to see some of the newer examples of artists who draw influence from Lo-Fi (Washed Out, Youth Lagoon), Electronica (CHVRCHES, Icona Pop, Charlie XCX), R&B (Solange), and Post-Punk (Savages).  At the end of June, Laneway organizers also announced that they would be adding a stage hosted by Detroit’s own Movement Electronic Music Festival/Paxahau, and Ann Arbor originals, electronic music label Ghostly International.  This new addition to the festival will feature 5 electronic artists on the Ghostly International label, including Matthew Dear, Adult., Beacon, Heathered Pearls, and Shigeto.

Meadowbrook Music Festival on the campus of Oakland University in Rochester Hills will feature four stages total for the September 14th festival; the Movement/Ghostly International stage, as well as two other stages which will be built on the grounds of Meadowbrook, and the main Meadowbrook amphitheatre itself. Specific set times and vendor names have yet to be announced, but festival organizers have promised that spaces will be dedicated to local food, drink, and merchandise vendors. For more information about getting to the festival, purchasing tickets ($79.50 in advance including parking fees, VIP package tickets for $199, and limited 4-packs for $64.50 per ticket are still available), and answers to other questions you may have, visit detroit.lanewayfestival.com.

 

Full Line-Up

Sigur Rós, The National, Deerhunter, The Dismemberment Plan, Matthew Dear, Run The Jewels (EL-P & Killer Mike), Adult., CHVRCHES, Savages, Washed Out, Solange, Warpaint, Frightened Rabbit, Phosphorescent, Icona Pop, Charlie XCX, My Brightest Diamond, AlunaGeorge, Beacon, Youth Lagoon, Shigeto, Flume, Haerts, Heathered Pearls, Chet Faker